Recent Storm Damage Posts

Do You Know Where Your Tornado-Safe Room Is?

9/21/2021 (Permalink)

tornado forming in grassy open field Storm season is on its way. SERVPRO of Gordon, Murray and South Whitfield Counties is available 24/7 in case a storm event hits your home.

Here’s a simple question with an answer that can help you keep your family safe: Do you know where the safest room in your house is if a tornado strikes?

That may sound like an odd thing to ask, but given that Georgia has, on average, about 30 tornadoes every year, it’s worth considering. These storms are dangerous and can damage property, cause injuries and even death. So it’s a good idea to know where to go in the event you need protection from a tornado.

There are a lot of options in today’s market. Some homeowners even opt to have a safe room added to or created inside their existing home. But many homeowners don’t have the ability to take this step. In these cases, it’s smart to know where to go in your existing home.

Here’s what the experts recommend to look for in a tornado-safe room:

Find a windowless space in the interior of your home. Your safe room is best if it doesn’t have exterior walls or windows. Think about bathrooms or closets.

Choose a room on the lowest floor of your home. The best spaces to take shelter during a tornado are on the lower floors of your home. Choose spaces on the lowest floor or the basement.

If your home isn’t safe, know an alternative location. Experts agree that in mobile or modular homes no room is safe from a tornado threat so it’s a good idea to have an alternative place to go. Additionally, if you live in a high-rise building or an apartment, ask your building manager about laundry rooms, basements or other safe areas.

If a fire, flood or any other cause damage to your home, you can always count on us for restoration assistance. We are available 247 in the event of an emergency. Contact us at any time to learn more about our restoration services and how we can help you.

Preparing Your Business for a Storm

8/25/2021 (Permalink)

A Severe Weather Plan can help you prepare for an approaching hurricane or another severe weather event. Make sure everyone in your business, especially your leadership team, understands the Severe Weather Plan. Each year, review the plan and update it as necessary.
  • Take the necessary precautions
  • If a storm threatens, secure your building and move equipment/furniture to a secured area.
  • Protect data with backup files
  • If your business depends on data processing, consider an alternate site. You should also make provisions for alternate communications and power.
  • Employee safety comes first. Prepare, distribute and follow your business hurricane plan for recovery.
  • Consider providing shelter to employees and their families and helping with supplies after a storm.
  • Establish a rendezvous point and time for employees in case communications are disrupted.
  • Establish a call-down procedure for warning and post-storm communications.
  • Provide photo IDs and a letter of authorization to enter the building.
  • Check your hurricane evacuation level and FEMA flood maps to determine if your business location is vulnerable to storm surge or freshwater flooding.
  • Have your building(s) inspected by a licensed professional to find out if your workplace is vulnerable to hurricane force winds and what is recommended to retrofit.

Why Preparing for a Disaster Makes Good Business Sense

11/5/2020 (Permalink)

There are many things that business owners must think about throughout their day-to-day operations, and for many of them, adding something extra onto this task list may seem impossible.

While this is understandable, when it comes to preparing for a disaster, it is imperative that business owners make the time to consider it. Many businesses do not get the chance to recover from a disaster, and while you can’t plan for everything, it is important to prepare for what you can.

Not only will disaster planning help you and your employees stay safer in advance of and during a disaster, but it also makes good businesses sense. Disaster recovery can be too difficult for businesses who have not prepared, rendering them unable to reopen. However, by thinking ahead and utilizing your resources, you can reduce the likelihood that this scenario will happen to you.

How Disaster Preparedness Helps a Business’ Bottom Line
You can quickly pursue restoration to prevent further damage. When you know which commercial restoration company you will work with, you are at an advantage, as you can immediately place the call to them once you discover damage at your business. This gets you in the queue faster, so you can receive a rapid response and prevent more damage from occurring in the meantime.

You can utilize your resources efficiently. After a disaster is declared, the Small Business Administration provides loans for business owners to help with the cost of recovery. If you know about these options in advance, you can apply right away when the time comes to receive these funds as quickly as possible.

You can lessen the time of closure. It is to be expected that you will have to close your doors for at least a bit while you have the damage restored and prepare to resume operations again, but by planning ahead, you can significantly reduce this time. By making your recovery as efficient as possible, you can get your doors reopened quickly so you can continue to do what you love.

If your business is damaged in a disaster, we are here to help you. Contact us about commercial restoration 24⁄7 to learn more or to report damages to your business after a disaster.

Hurricane Safety

10/6/2020 (Permalink)

Hurricane season began June 1, 2019 and will run through November 30. As hurricanes become more prevalent in surrounding areas of Georgia, so does the economic impact on its communities. Prepare for intense weather condition now with these safety tips.

  • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
  • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.